Brian R. Ellis

Assistant Professor

Office:  1351 Beal Avenue, 211 EWRE
Phone:  (734) 763-5470
Fax:  (734) 764-4292
Email:  brellis@umich.edu

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
1351 Beal Avenue, 211 EWRE
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2125

  • Ph.D., Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 2012
  • M.A., Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 2009
  • B.S., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2006
  • NSF Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability (SEES) Fellow, 2012 - 2016.
  • Junior Fellow, Michigan Society of Fellows, 2012 - 2015.
  • Freeman Fellowship, American Society of Civil Engineers, 2010.
  • NSF-AEESP Grand Challenge Student Paper Award, 2009.
  • Science, Technology & Environmental Policy Fellowship, Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University, 2009.
  • Member, Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors.
  • Member, American Geophysical Union.
  • Member, Geochemical Society.

My research interests cover topics related to the sustainable and safe development of emerging energy technologies. Included among these activities are geologic storage of CO2 and large-scale hydrualic fracturing of unconventional oil/gas reservoirs. We examine important water-rock interactions that occur in these subsurface systems through a combination of experimental studies (bench-scale high-pressure flow-through and batch reactors), imaging techniques (computed micro-tomography, SEM, XRF, XANES), and geochemical modeling. Specific topics of interest: permeability evolution in fractured geologic media, release/transport of groundwater contaminants from shale gas reservoirs, development of regulatory policy pertaining to hydraulic fracturing activities.

Ellis, B.R., Peters, C.A., Fitts, J.P., Bromhal, G.S., McIntyre, D.L., Warzinski, R.P., Rosenbaum E.J. (2011), Deterioration of a fractured carbonate caprock exposed to CO2-acidified brine flow. Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology, 1, 248–260.

Ellis, B.R., Crandell, L.E., Peters, C.A. (2010), Limitations for brine acidification due to SO2 co-injection in geologic carbon sequestration. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 4(3), 575–582.

Crandell, L.E., Ellis, B.R., Peters, C.A. (2010), Dissolution potential of SO2 co-injected with CO2 in geologic sequestration. Environmental Science and Technology, 44(1), 349–355.


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